The Red Sox’s roster change has created a version of music chairs in the cramped home clubhouse

BOSTON — It’s already hard to overlook Triston Casas given his 6-foot-4, 250-pound frame.

But when the 23-year-old was promoted to the Red Sox a month ago, he took a spot right in the middle of the clubhouse in a makeshift locker, a common home for many rookies at the end of the season.

It’s an almost too perfect metaphor that Casas is the center of attention in the cramped clubhouse, despite having a few other newcomers as residents of what is affectionately called “the island,” a collection of extra lockers pulled from storage and placed in the house in the center of the room to accommodate the additional players. As of the Red Sox’s last homestand, its current “island” residents have included catcher Ronaldo Hernandez and helpers Franklin German and Zack Kelly, but the spots move so frequently that Monday’s final three games of the season will be different could.

“It’s a little weird being in a middle locker in the middle of the room,” Casas admitted. “But I don’t feel like I’m in anyone’s way. I feel like I’m in a big group, the rookies, so at least I’m not alone.”

It’s all an unenviable puzzle that clubhouse manager Tommy McLaughlin and assistant manager Josh Liebenow piece together weekly — sometimes daily — as players call up or return from baseball’s smallest home clubhouse.

https://theathletic.com/3649464/2022/10/03/red-sox-clubhouse-hierarchy/?source=rss The Red Sox’s roster change has created a version of music chairs in the cramped home clubhouse

John Verrall

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